What Andre Agassi Can Teach You About Being A Better Person

By Yaro Starak
99 Comments

I just finished reading Andre Agassi’s autobiography titled Open.

I LOVE tennis bios, they are possibly my favorite book genre because I love tennis, but more than playing it, I love following the professional tour and especially the people in the game. For me, it’s the personalities and the human stories that really inspire, hence I love it when the top players release books about their life playing the game.

Agassi’s bio was different to others I have read (I have Sampras, McEnroe, Newcombe and Scott Draper in my collection so far). Why it was different was because how much the book focused on Agassi and a few key people in his life and less specifically about the game of tennis, the matches he played and the people he played against.

Tennis tournaments and players certainly play a role in the book, but the focus is more on Agassi’s personal journey to discover himself. Reading the book felt a lot like reading what an angsty teenager goes through growing up. Lots of uncontrolled emotions from a person locked into doing things he doesn’t want to do.

Surprisingly, Agassi actually hates tennis and states so many times in the book, further demonstrating how bizarre a life can be for someone who is brought up to do one thing and one thing only, when he doesn’t actually want to. As Agassi grows up he gains control over his life, yet his hatred for the game he keeps playing remains, which makes the contrast even more bizarre, since he is choosing to continue to do something he doesn’t want to do.

Then of course, if you really think about it, Agassi is doing the same thing most people do today.

How many people continue working jobs they don’t want to every day because they feel they have to for whatever reason? Lots. Probably more people do this than people who actually enjoy and have passion for the job they do. This unique form of insanity is shared by many people on this planet, but the fact that Agassi excelled as he did, makes his story even more compelling.

Hard Work Pays Off

I took away a few key lessons from Agassi’s life as a tennis player that relate directly to all of us, no matter what we do.

Although Agassi had a unique talent, it’s pretty clear why he was as good as he was, is because of his work ethic and training regime.

It started with his father who made him hit a million balls a year as a kid to develop his strokes and reflexes. It continued as Agassi was molded into a super-athlete thanks to Gil, his trainer and bodyguard. Many times Agassi won matches because he had “more in the tank” than other players, playing just as fresh in the fifth set as the first.

You have to take this on board beyond just the physical advantage. It’s a huge mental advantage too, knowing you can outlast other players physically. This means you won’t give up mentally because you trust and believe in your abilities.

Knowing you can do something is often more important than actually being able to do it. Having the belief can make it true, and although you can never know what came first, the chicken or the egg, often it’s what you believe and thus act that makes things real.

I found Agassi’s book motivating because of how hard he worked. It made me want to work harder too.

One of the dangers in the lifestyle I lead, which you are likely striving for right now, is that you gain tremendous freedom. Once you meet your financial goals, set up some passive or near passive income streams, you find yourself with more time and too many options.

Some people become addicted to the rush of achievement and the thrill of making money, so they use all their time to grow an even bigger business. Others use their new found freedoms to do different things, to relax, have a holiday and indulge in leisure activities. Unfortunately most people tend to lose balance, either becoming workaholics, a slave to always wanting more, or they become lazy, and start to lose their passion altogether.

I personally strive for balance, but it’s not always easy. I’m lazier than I’d like to be, so I found Agassi’s story motivating. It made me want to achieve and do so on a grander scale each time. It’s made me want to turn 2010 into a big year, a bigger year than I may have otherwise if I didn’t read the book.

Giving Is the Purest Action

Although Agassi had a hate-love relationship with tennis, and you could say it continued beyond tennis – he had a love-hate relationship with life and he struggled to reconcile the two – there were some key moments in the book that stand out as beacons of clarity.

These moments focused on one very specific thing – helping others.

Agassi noted that he felt so right helping other people, whether it was the injured daughter of his trainer Gil, or starting a school for disadvantaged teens in his hometown of Las Vegas, or helping to save the life of a friend’s premature baby. There was no angst about these actions. It was just right, pure, what he – what all of us – are meant to do.

It appears to me that we are wired to find peace, enjoyment and contentment in helping other people. Whether it’s the smallest act of everyday kindness, up to grand gestures of giving or lifetime commitments to serving others. We’re meant to make other people feel safe, happy and find comfort, that in turn gifts us the gift of purpose and peace.

The wonderful thing about giving is that it’s not just about what you might term altruistic activities. Yes it’s a wonderful idea to be like Mother Theresa and spend your entire life helping those in dire need, but it doesn’t have to be as single-minded as that, if you don’t want it to be.

Giving has also emerged as the most powerful marketing technique available today. There’s nothing more satisfying in my life knowing I can write a blog post that has the potential to help thousands of people, and I can earn money doing so. It’s wonderful that you can write a report full of your best ideas, give it away so you can help lots of people without them spending a cent, and still make money when a tiny fraction of those people choose to give you money in exchange for more from you.

Helping others, giving of yourself and focusing on how you can deliver value, is the key to living a fulfilling life. However in yet another of life’s wonderful dichotomies, most of our focus is on what WE want. How we can get what WE desire, improve our OWN lives. When you realize what’s best for you is actually what is best for everyone else, you start to realize how connected we really are.

Life Is The Best Example

One thing I’ve noticed lately, since I’m more open to it than I have ever been before, is how life is one constant example.

Books, people, events, actions and consequences, whether it is your life or others, are all designed to help you discover what is your truth. Everything is a lesson, teaching you either what you want, or what you don’t want, creating clarity by simply showing you more about you.

The truth is already in you, but you need the stimulation of outside influences in order to crystallize it. Thankfully we can’t opt-out of this process, just by living you are participating. However you can choose to ignore it, which unfortunately leads more often to a focus on what you don’t like and choices made to perceive experiences in a way that doesn’t benefit you. That’s the only risk you face – choosing ignorance – of who you are and what everything around you means.

If you’re a tennis fan, or just enjoy a good character story, I recommend you check out Andre Agassi: Open.

Yaro Starak
Tennis Fan

P.S. In Agassi’s book he comes across as very different to the way I perceived him as a player, which I think except for those people close to him, is a statement many people will share. Agassi spent much of his career flat out lying to the media, saying what he thought people wanted to hear, rather than his truth, which was buried deep within layers of the angst, confusion and lack of identity he felt. The book feels very much like a decision to “wipe the slate clean” and come out with how it was really like for him as a person, rather than how the media portrayed him.

Consequently, due to the openness of the book, it’s garnered a lot of press coverage. Agassi did drugs. Agassi lied to the ATP about it. Agassi tanked in some big matches. Agassi is brutally honest about his opinion of other players, much of which is not friendly. The book is full of drama, and the media – and us – love drama. You could say it was a very smart marketing decision, given sensationalism spreads, but it was also a risky choice for Andre as he has damaged his reputation in the eyes of some people.

I like this book for its honesty, and as I said previously, it serves as a great example to come up with our own truths. Agassi is just as good of an example of what to do as he is an example of what NOT to do. I think the biggest example of what not to do in this book came from Agassi’s father, who didn’t let Andre grow up as a normal child and make the decision of what to do with his life for himself. Instead his father made the decision and then turned tennis into a jail for Andre. That’s not healthy, and it’s clear much of Agassi’s personal torments were born from this upbringing, even if his father was doing it out of love for his son.

Agassi made the choice to be honest with many things and he obviously prepared himself for the consequences, though he no doubt could never be truly ready for what was to come. I feel it’s more important to use his story as a tool to enhance your life, rather than simply a means to judge Agassi. Take Andre’s good traits and use them as inspiration in your life. Observe what you consider negative things that Andre did and make sure you don’t repeat his mistakes in your life.

It’s easy to label someone as good or bad based on their actions, but you should judge the actions and not the person. People are always a work in progress – life is a work in progress – and you’d have to agree you are too. It doesn’t matter how good or famous or gifted you are, we all are human.

Andre Agassi: Open

About Yaro Starak

Yaro Starak is the author of the Blog Profits Blueprint, a report you can download instantly to learn how to make $10,000 a month, from only blogging 2 hours per day. You can find Yaro on Facebook, Twitter and .

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99 Comments

  • Hi Yaro,
    I think it’s great we learn lessons not only from people in our niche, but from people in all spheres. You’re into entrepreneurship and I’m into personal development and yet we can both learn so much from a champion tennis player. I think that’s the bees knees. :)

    • Inspiring post. You can always take a great deal from others and implement them into your life some how. Often you have to look at life from different perspectives to see the full benefits that life has to offer.

  • Agassi is my all time favorite Tennis player and high on my top favorites on any sports. Thanks for sharing and pulling great lessons from the inspirational story!

    As you mentioned, helping others is the key to fulfilling life. Understanding this will change everything. It’s an interesting concept looking at giving as marketing technique too.

    I mean, it’s not as pure as giving without expecting anything in return, is it? On the other hand, when you continue helping others through a blog for example, the good will come back to you. And if one can make a living by giving to others, isn’t that the perfect situation?

  • The direction we take and decisions that we make define who we are in life. Agassai accomplished many great things because of the lessons and values that were instilled into him at a very young age.

    Great people do not achieve their greatness out of shear luck. No, instead they have earned it through sometimes challenging and difficult experiences. Agassai has changed the skill level of how the game is played today.

  • Thanks for share your valuable hint. I think your message will help the people who are following you. I also liked very much the word like helping to others is means to fulfill life.

    I am absolute agree with that point because each and every moment we should help to people as per as our possible.

  • I think it is great that someone can inspire another so much. We all learn differently and at the end of the day it really comes down to the drive. I believe it’s not even what we accomplish but rather our desire and passion for doing something in life.

    I say this because anyone can accomplish just about anything they put their mind to. Accomplishment is great, don’t get me wrong, however I believe that if you want something bad enough, THAT’S the accomplishment right there because you then know you are going to get what it is you are after. I will have to read this book because it sounds very good indeed.

  • Nice one.

    You see I have heard this thing about follow your passion. I think that phrase is one of the most mis-understood phrase in online most especially in the IM niche.

    Why?

    I am sure you will agree with me that life is a journey. Everyday is chance to discover and rediscover once self. Although some folks are super opinionated hence they say things unequivocally and that make you think, gee, this person must know this topic very well.

    Of course since expertise is based on how your client or others perceive you, people think you are the main man! You are the go to “gooroo”

    But what they don’t don’t know is that that “goo-roo” in their most quiet time is actually wondering what the heck they wanted . That so called guru does not have a clue what they wanted but they could read books, put the whole thing together and tell you what to do.

    One of my most favorite movies of all time is Goodwill hunting. Remember that part when Robin Williams stated to use the F word so that he could relate with his client.(not that I encourage the use of it )

    My point here is that a lot of us are not real. A lot of us go through life without having a clue what the heck we REALLY WANT.

    Lots of us can’t even find our voice and don’t even know how to.

    A lot of folks will follow their passion and may never even be happy. They don’t even know what the term passion means in the first place.

    You wanna talk about following your passion, then talk about about folks who followed it and died for it.

    Yes, folks like Paul who was passionate for the preaching of the Gospel. There are so many of these activists out there who don’t mind dieing all in the cause of bringing equal right and justice to the world.

    Now that is passion. Real passion!! That my friend is knowing your purpose in life.

    I like this one Yaro:

    It support my concept that none of us has arrived. We are all discovering every day. We man not ever know who the heck we are until we “give up the ghost”; but these hypocites out there will take you to find out who the heck you are because they have a loud mouth.

    “Books, people, events, actions and consequences, whether it is your life or others, are all designed to help you discover what is your truth. Everything is a lesson, teaching you either what you want, or what you don’t want, creating clarity by simply showing you more about you.”

    What do I believe in?

    I don’t believe in this passion stuff. I have an open mind in the sense that everyday, i tried to figure out who i am, what i am make up of. and hopefully my environment, life, circumstances will help shape me and give me experiences that i can use to further help others.

    Trust me, your life experience in worth more than all that someone else put in books and that is why I love your blog very much.

    -a raving fan of yours.

    **sorry I don’t know of a nicer,cozy way to say this

  • I liked McEnroe’s bio myself. What really amused me was his descriptions of Jimmy Connors who is my favorite player. Watching Connors playing Wimbledon matches at dusk when he could barely see the ball was thrilling. I would say that he had McEnroe mentally defeated before they went into each match. Connors embodies qualities that will take you far in life – self-belief and determination.

  • A lot can be learned by examining the lives and decisions of successful people. He may have faced a lot of personal demons, but he found a way to cope with them and succeed. Unfortunately he turned to drugs and wasn’t honest with himself. This book seems as a way to get a lot off his shoulders. Of course the book publisher probably wanted the juiciest details to make more money.

  • Very inspiring Yaro! Thanks for this post.

  • Amazing story. I had no idea Agassi had such a love-hate relationship with tennis. I wonder how many aspiring entrepreneurs go through the same thing — hating the actual process but loving the wealth, fame, or other rewards that come along with it. Thanks for this post and for the reminder of how important it is to look into the lives of others for inspiration, reflection, and a deeper understanding of our own dreams and goals! -Jason Clegg

  • I have not read Agassi’s book, but now I want to. The video at the end of the post really got to me. Honesty – that is what I got from what he said and how the video was produced. It is tempting to think that for someone with the skills, fame, looks and personality of Andre Agassi, that everything must be easy. We all struggle – that is life.

  • That love/hate relationship really carries over into my attempts at building an internet business. I don’t continue because I “feel I have to” but because I must continue.

    It’s the marketing technique of “giving first” that will ultimately prove us all successful.

    Without a doubt, Agassi’s personal revelations will be from his heart, and become the inspiration for many of our far-reaching enterprises.

    Looking forward to more MarkitUp preview! Sounds like inspiration from the heart there as well…

  • Andre is no exception. Almost all of us get stuck to what we are doing and stay there, whether we like it or not, because we build a comfort zone around whatever it is that we are doing. Very like barnacles whose existential question is answered when it finds a ship’s bottom and gets stuck to it, dies there and calcifies there.

  • Yaro, you always seem to come up with motivating blog post

    The thing that stands out to me the most is the fact that many people do what they ‘hate’ doing and I think that is mainly due to fear of failure or change.

    I’m always looking to give and I totally agree that it’s a great marketing approach… that’s probably why I have several ebooks, videos… that I give away

  • Inspiration can come from anywhere and everywhere providing you’re seeking it. It’s the same thought with one person thinking the glass is half full whilst someone else says it’s half empty. A lot of it depends on the person reading and how they interpret what they see.

  • Helping others can be applied to your business ventures as well. I like to seek out the pain that my customers are facing in their businesses and then set out to resolve it. Whilst this is not at the same level as saving someone’s life it can be very rewarding (on both personal and business levels).

    I find by focusing on the other person and their business needs I have much more clarity and resolve to achieve. Somehow, thinking ‘what’s in it for me’ just doesn’t do it.

    I not particularly interested in tennis, but I might just buy the book!

  • Woah. It’s good to know that even the best at their game do not always love what they do but is a love/hate relationship with anything REALLY being true to oneself?

    Guys like Ronaldinho and Cristiano Ronaldo (who might be the 1st billionaire footballer) say they would have played football for free. Theirs is love/love relationship.

    Late last year, I listened to an old Yaro-podcast where he talked about working at a library with Alborz and from the way he talked, you could sense he did not enjoy that period of his life much. That was way back. Now he does something he really loves and other things can be secondary.

    Right there and then, I decided never to do anything that i do not feel a deep intuitive connection with regardless of the financial rewards. I have done some normal things that I hated and sometimes wondered why I did them until realized it was for the money or just to satisfy people i have high regard for.

    Reading this post has strengthened my resolve to help others even more. The truth is we are all more alike and connected to each other than we know.

    The happiest people on earth are those that realize this early and help others regardless.

  • SEO

    Thanks for this post…

  • Wow, thanks for the review Yaro. Def going to read this book. Amazing example for a person who hates their job but excelled on it.

  • I watched an intview on uk tv where he was promoting his book and he was saying that his hatred for tennis continued until he was about 27 when he finally took control or something along those lines. It certainly sounds like a very interesting book, a good stocking filler :-)

  • Everyone deserves a chance to reflect on the misguided choices they make in life, and try to set things right and absolve some of the guilt, regret and hurt they carry and have burdened others with.

    Being in the right frame of mind (positive) and carrying on with carrying out good deeds to others as well as to yourself will keep you level headed and sane. If you constantly push back and hide and bottle up negativity, your production becomes negative and your attitude pushes others away.

    I feel for Agassi’s plight when he was playing, but I’m glad he was able to move forward and shed some of that weight upon his shoulders. Be a better person, be a better, more productive member of society.

    Oddly enough, the more negativity I’ve shed in the last year, the better my results have become. I notice that I keep being ‘tested’ with negativity, but so far, I remain confident and happy (and productive).

    Here’s looking forward to the New Year!

  • Talent is worthless if you don’t work hard and put it to good use. I think athletes in general is a fine example.

  • Hey Yaro,

    thanks for this post, you’re so cool! I enjoy reading this blog everytime, I just like your writing skills and what you’re blogging about. I’m also recommending your Clickbank products, so keep up the good work and share the information.

    Cheers,
    Pete

  • It reminded me that Sugar Ray Robinson, possibly the best boxer of all time, despised the sport.

  • You presented many lessons in this post but the one that strikes out for me is this -

    “I feel it’s more important to use his story as a tool to enhance your life, rather than simply a means to judge Agassi. Take Andre’s good traits and use them as inspiration in your life. Observe what you consider negative things that Andre did and make sure you don’t repeat his mistakes in your life.”

    Thanks Yaro for giving us many things to ponder from your post.

    Jose

  • I haven’t read his book yet, I’ve been thinking about getting it though. I’ve heard it also has some great stories in like how he took drugs during his career, etc.

    Might pick it up in the January sales. :)

  • My father also reminds me – there is no elevator to success, you have to take the stairs. Unless those fingers aren’t hurting, you aren’t typing enough! Nuff said!

  • Andre came clean on a couple of issues with this honest autobiography, and I for one am still as great a supporter of his as I’ve always been. To play competitive tennis wearing a hair piece must have been most unpleasant. The symbolic shaving of his head later on in life reflects on him having grown beyond feeling hair is important.

  • Beautiful story, insights, and write up.

    > won matches because he had “more in the tank” than other players, playing just as fresh in the fifth set as the first.
    That’s a proven formula in so many sports. For coaches that know this, they push their team to actually train harder as they get worn down. This is the difference that makes the difference.

  • Yaro,

    Great Post!

    I couldn’t agree with you more, on the topic of ‘giving’ as a powerful marketing tool.
    I have noticed that no matter what the industry is, the industry leaders that really excel at what they do, fully understand the importance of giving, and they give back in a big way. Not only is giving back a great thing to do, but it also helps to attract people to you. As these people begin to see that you care, and are willing to help out others. Giving is a win win scenario. You are able to help out others and show your genuine nature, and at the same time, you are able to attract more people towards your cause.

    You are also a great example of someone who gives. The knowledge and insight that you share with all of your readers is so valuable.

    Thanks for all that you do.

    Best Regards,
    Neil Uttamsingh.

  • I’m definately going to get this book. I had no idea Andre hated tennis – and your analogy is spot on – so many people just do what they do without any awareness of what else is available to them. Thanks Yaro for sharing your passion for tennis, it’s a awesome game!

  • Fantastic post, Yaro. I thoroughly enjoy your writing :)

  • I was just searching for reviews of this wonderful book and now after reading i am definitely gonna order it , thanks Yaro for wonderful insight about this book :)

  • I’m also 1st generation American, as is my wife. There’s something about doing something you hate. You can just get so frigging good at it. Sometimes it’s easier to excel at something you hate, because of the detachment. Excelling at something you love can be very very scary.

  • Thanks Yaro for this wonderful insight

  • I haven’t read many bio’s but this one certainly sounds like it’s worth a read. My favorite bio’s were Grant Hackett’s and It’s Not About The Bike. Personally I don’t think I could consistently do something that I hate – I have actually tried in the past but it was just so hard on me that I gave it up.

  • I saw the book yesterday in the libary and I’m going to buy it because of the good comments at amazon and your insight.

  • Agassi can honestly say “while I was your hero, while you admired me, while I was talked about…I hated it. I just hated it.” In particular, I find his message about drugs powerful. It’s clearing to hear Agassi’s story, and he seems to have come into a good place. I hope it brings him joy.

  • I saw the book together very nice

  • That’s pretty wild that he has a love/hate relationship with tennis. At the same tiem I am sure he must like what the sport has brought to him and his life. But you are right there is alot to learn from him. Yaro I am confident you will achieve the goals you want for 2010.

    Till then,

    Jean

  • I’ve heard of the Andre Agassi’s biography. The more I read about this person the more I perceive him as a role model. I must read this book.

  • Got this book for Christmas and plan to get started on it next week. I can kind of relate in a way because at the end of my playing career (college level), I hated tennis too. Actually broke all my rackets and left them (for dead) in a cemetery.

    Looking back though, it really provided me a lot of opportunities (college scholarship) and opened additional doors (close friendships, etc.).

  • I hope Federer writes a similar open autobiography one day. It would be very interesting to see how similar he is to Agassi – they seem to have very different styles of tennis.

    It’s surprising how many people who are really good at something don’t actually like it. I’m for finding a way to do what brings us joy. It will be interesting to see if this leads to Agassi finding a way to live a life that he loves.

  • This was a really good article, thanks for sending me the link. I have decided to give up a well paying job this year in order to grow and learn with my children by travelling the world. Your right when you mention people sticking in dead end situations out of fear. Its time to start living, methinks.

    Thanks for the encouragement.

    Dipsey

  • Your Message
    One has to wonder what Agassi would be accomplishing in life if all of the energy and discipline he put into tennis was directed to a core passion! We live in a world where we are not supported in knowing ourselves well enough to discover and own our passion and unique sense of purpose. Is there a way to reverse that trend? My passion for the past 30 years has been to answer that question and I’m happy to report that the answer is yes!

    • Dear Shayla Roberts,

      It’s possible, that had Andre devoted his life to a “core passion,” he may have never succeeded at all. Discipline may have faltered, he may have allowed other things to get in the way. Especially with 1st generation Americans, there’s really something to excelling at things you hate. Detachment brings results too, and anger is force. Contempt is also a form of detachment, and these are incredibly powerful energies. Sometimes, when you are “attached” to a passion, a core passion, if you will, you basically write a prescription for failure.

  • Imagine if Tiger Woods had been his authentic self instead of trying to hide it from the public, how different everything would have been. Andre’s example provides a great contrast. It’s made even more poignant because he actually hated tennis (which I never knew).

  • Yes I am quite surprised to hear that he hated tennis. He must have really had some serious issues to be able to train and compete so hard at something he detests. Most people probably would’ve caved and gave up much earlier.

  • What a great post Yaro.

    Life lesson is an endless journey. You either grow from it or will just never had a clue. I love sports and enjoy watching them but learning from sport greats about life is even more satisfying.

    I started playing tennis in college and Agassi and Steffi Graf was my favourite tennis player back then. What a dream couple. Wish them happily ever after.

    I always dream of becoming an professional athlete but life didn’t seem to play along with me. I guess life wants me to go to a different destination.

    Anyhow I believe it still has something to do with sport also but maybe not now. Will see how it will turn out. Just can’t wait.

    Red

  • I really enjoyed reading your post. I have been a tennis player and fan for years also. While I was shocked by Agassi’s interviews, I never changed my positive opinion of him. We amateurs have no idea of the pressure, unending dedication, practice and life style in the world of professional sports. I commend Agassi for coming forward and admitting to such a secret.

    I also took away some great insight about life choices which I will remember as I work with clients. thanks

  • Wow Yaro, your message is very timely as the New Year begins. When us internet marketers determine what kind of year we want 2010 to be, your post and the videos have really made me stop and take notice and enable me to determine my own path.

    I’ve always known I wanted to motivate others to find their passion and dream big, but this is such a great reminder.

    I appreciate hearing from you today!

    Happy New Year all,

    Cheers!
    Terri

  • Yaro,

    The message you’ve gotten from the book and have posted here is incredible. It really is a testament to how well you can communicate and get your “thoughts onto paper” effectively…definitely something that I think we can ALL learn from. So kudos to you for developing that skill buddy. It really shows in this article and all of your recent articles that I’ve been reading.

    Just knowing that Andre Agassi didn’t enjoy what he was doing is a complete shock, as I’ve been following his career for quite some time. Although he didn’t seem too happy in many press conferences, the fact that he had been unhappy playing tennis is flat-out crazy. It really proves that you don’t know anything about anyone unless you REALLY get to know them.

    I certainly have learned A LOT from this blog post, including the fact that you should NEVER pre-judge anyone. Always give people a chance to enter your life, because you can ABSOLUTELY learn something from everyone. By being more open-minded and accepting of others, it can only help you through life, and this is very related to the “giving” concept that you brought up. By giving more and freely offering your services to others, you will get back what you gave them tenfold, whether it be life lessons or monetary compensation.

    Thank you so much for this post Yaro, as it ABSOLUTELY has opened my eyes EVEN WIDER!! :-)

    Cheers,
    Jomo

  • wow, great post, this very nice and give me idea ti write post in my blog, thank;s yaro

  • If someone can endure something, come through it and then teach others because of it, then they have done what is part of their life’s plan. Too many, I fear, don’t do the third and most important thing – share with others and teach them.

  • Thanks for the post Yaro.

    Andre was, is, and always will be my hero.

    He has an amazing presence and the discipline that he applied to his gift to develop it ever further, at a time when others simply faded away, should inspire each and everyone of us to be a better version of ourselves.

    Glad to know you’re a fan of Andre’s and a tennis player too.

    Let’s hit some around sometime soon.

    Rick Falls

  • Yaro, I’ve been blogging for over a year, always looking for more ideas and inspiration to grow my blog. When I was looking for a “guru” to teach me, I came across your blog and was more than impressed with your attitude about giving great value free! So impressed that I signed up for your membership site class and have been following along. It’s an attitude that you focus on in your review of Agassi’s book:
    “It appears to me that we are wired to find peace, enjoyment and contentment in helping other people. Whether it’s the smallest act of everyday kindness, up to grand gestures of giving or lifetime commitments to serving others. We’re meant to make other people feel safe, happy and find comfort, that in turn gifts us the gift of purpose and peace.”
    You do all of that yourself! Thanks for being a great inspiration to me and a lot of bloggers.

  • Yaro, thanks very much for your insightful view of Andre’s biography and life. I’ve always admired Andre enormously and am now inspired to read the book. I’ve liked your blog so much I’ve decided to send it on to one of my kids who is tormented by similar experiences. Sharing is true caring and I’ve always felt that Andre cared.

  • I love reading biographies as well Yaro… They are awesome! I’m listening to richard branson’s bio right now and I love to learn from amazing people! Hard work and training does pay off for everyone! athletes know that but I think so many entrepreneurs give up because they don’t see immediate results. When there aren’t immediate results it’s difficult sometimes to stick with it. But sticking with it pays off big time!

    Thanks for the post man!

    David

  • Great Post Yaro,
    I can not believe this man who I grew up watching on TV and actually looked up to, Hated what he did. Amazing. Imagine the thoughts going through his head.
    I know he made millions but to actually do it while hating it..hmmm.
    Will pick up the book next week and have a read.
    T

  • i liked the insights about his work ethic, I always like hearing about “how” someone got where they are because that mindset can be modeled.

    Thank you for the post

  • Thank you for a great review of Andre Agassi’s book. I would not normally go out and by a book like this but you certainly have me intrigued enough to do just that.
    I had the pleasure of listening to Andre speak at a seminar I attended. I was struck my the difference between his very humble talk and the media identification.

    Maintaining a balance in life requires a constant awareness of self and the forces at play in ones life. But it is a struggle worth fighting for. Balance is the center of all things.

    Nick

  • saj

    Agassi was always my favourite player.Thanks for the post.

  • I have also just finished reading Agassi’s book and found it to be truly inspiring. I have always been a huge fan of his, but reading about his struggles and the journey he went on to get to where he is today, makes me an even bigger fan. I loved the part at the end where the 15 year old kid thanks him for changing his life. How great a feeling that must be! To know that you have changed someone’s life for the better. Although he hated tennis, I can understand his decision to mount a ‘comeback’ for the purposes of helping others with the fame and money he earned. Truly a noble purpose. Thanks for the great post!

  • ian

    Hi Yaro..Thank you for the post ..very helpful.

    Your right about helping others..it seems moral laws are as fixed as physical ones;
    you reap what you sow …or as Zig Ziglar said : ” The more you help people get what they want ,the more you get what you want ”

    That’s one reason i founded rubbishtippeople ..there are millions of poor who need help …perhaps they can help us more in mitigating climate change ??

    Thank you again Ian

  • Great blog . I particularly like your PS reminding us not to judge. We are quick to tell others what they should or should not do, without knowing what it is like to walk in their shoes. I endorse your comment: “People are always a work in progress – life is a work in progress”. I’m glad of the opportunity each day brings to learn and grow, and it is my life’s mission to help and encourage others in their journey also. Like you’ I’m conscious of how important it is to have clarity of purpose – success depends upon it! Abundant blessings to you ….. SUZI

  • Hi Yaro, thanks for the great review. It’s all about having a crack at what you want to do. My grandad used to say ‘it’s better to live one day like a lion than 100 days like a sheep.’ I’ve never forgotten these words, and I spend my life trying to find ways to feed my passion, which is travelling around the world and experiencing what it has to offer.

    Thanks again!

  • fas

    We can learn alot for sports personalities. The determination, the will to win and be positive at all times even when victory is far.

  • Hmm…tricky question lol..I woudl like to be person y becasue he’s improving and he’s tryign hard and thats really good.

  • Hi Yaro

    That was a really thought-provoking piece of writing. I too am a tennis fan and I think you’ve just helped to sell another copy of Andre’s book.

    Keep up the good work!

    Ian D

  • Hi Yaro, thanks for the great review.

  • Hi Yaro, thanks for the great review. …..

  • People blow things out of proportion because they expect celibritys to be perfect. I think it’s a dumb idea to expect anyone to be perfect and we all know it’s not possible. I just don’t understand it when people gasp at the reality of things they know to be about people!

  • GREAT post yaro, once again! thank you.

    heart n soul n ethics shine thru in what u say…. if we all give a little then we all receive so much more! tis truly an abundant uni-verse

    ya gotta love the realm of polarities eh?

    blissings galore
    Devi SoulJuice

  • Hello Yaro,

    Wanna know whats happening in the Real World ??? While we sit here and work http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VebOTc-7shU Look at This

    Gary,
    PS GET THE WORD OUT,

  • Dear Yaro,

    This may be the best post I have ever read. If your photo wasn’t on your site and I couldn’t see your age, I would think you are a very, very old person.

    I don’t want to get too dramatic, but this post has caused a shift in me. My 2010 is going to be different after reading this post. I’m going to keep track of what I do different because of it so I can measure it.

    Thank you very much,
    Sharon Beck

  • Just another quick comment…my husband was so taken with this post that he is at the moment, laboriously translating it into Hungarian for his mom who is visiting us from Budapest. That is not an easy task. Thanks again for it. So inspirational.

    Sharon Beck

  • Fantastic post Yaro! I have always been a big fan of Andre Agassi and it was nice to hear about some more of his personal life. This post has also been very inspirational becomes it shows you the value of hard work and how it will pay off if you are consistent enough. Thanks for sharing.

  • Excellent post Yaro!

    It is great to learn from well-known athletes.

    I agree 100% that life is fulfilling when you help others. I get the most enjoyment from my blog when someone thanks me for helping them. Money is great, we all need it to survive, but I would not enjoy writing my blog if I did not get the comments that I do get.

    Thanks again for another wonderful post!

    -Todd

  • Wow thanks for the review, for some one to be so honest in a book, its takes a lot to be so honest like that. You can learn a lot from sport players. The hard workers become successful.

  • Wow what insite into creating the life you want. We always look to celeberties and movie stars thinkning they did it all right, but really you need to look at yourself and create the lifestyle you really want for yourself.

  • I agree 100% that life is fulfilling when you help others. I get the most enjoyment from my blog when someone thanks me for helping them. Money is great, we all need it to survive, but I would not enjoy writing my blog if I did not get the comments that I do get.

  • Yaro. I think that Agassi is a legend. Tennis is one of my favourite sports to play and watch. I have my own personal heroes in my field of interest. People like Flex Wheeler, Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose biographies I have read and kept on my shelf. You and them have inspired me to move forward with an interest that I have had for a while now (getting back into shape and developing my blog).

    I have also read an article posted by Dee Barizo on http://www.performancing.com, entitled, 3 REASONS BLOGGERS SHOULD READ BOOKS. It’s a fact, the more fresh material you have, the less likely you are to post material which is an echo of another site.

    I salute you

  • This is a great post

  • Hi Yaro, this is a great post. Many of us can relate to doing something because we feel there is no way out, and so we continue to do it. I certainly was one of them . Truly an inspiring blog.. and who can’t do with a little more inspiration!

  • Very moving video clip at the end. I have always been a big fan of Andre Agassi but never knew that he didn’t even liked the game he was the world champion for. And its hard to even imaging a guy as successful as him regrets a lot.

  • seo

    I agree 100% that life is fulfilling when you help others. I get the most enjoyment from my blog when someone thanks me for helping them. Money is great, we all need it to survive, but I would not enjoy writing my blog if I did not get the comments that I do get.

  • Love the post! You didn’t judge him which a lot of people tend to do when it comes to famous people. Instead you asked why, ‘what can I learn from here?’ and shared it with everyone.

    I particularly like how you highlighted the fact that many of us spend a lifetime doing things we don’t like nor enjoy and yet, we are surprised when we hear this from those who have found success and fame. I look forward to sitting down with my own copy!

  • Its good to know that Im not alone regretting a lot of things I’ve done in my past. People like agassi who seem perfect in every way also are like us. He definitely is one of tennis’s most well known champion.

  • V look at someone like agassi and v so easily conclude that he’s happy but its not always true.

  • There’s definitely more to Andre’s book than hairpiece, drugs and hate for tennis.
    Unfortunately, there are some who refuse to go beyond the book’s sensationalised facade.

    Hope they get to read your post and realise that “Andre taught us something about being a better person”. And I hope that Andre will get to read your post and realise that his honesty has paid-off.

    More power to you!
    All the best to Andre!

  • helping them. Money is great, we all need it to survive, but I would not enjoy writing my blog if I did not get the comments that I do get

  • V look at someone like agassi and v so easily conclude that he’s happy but its not always true.

  • That sounds like a great read. I have never been into Bios all that much but I have read a few. I have followed tennis since I was a kid as My mother and her friends played a lot. I had many lessons and while I wasn’t bad i wasn’t good either. I was more of a field player. But I really enjoy tennis and It is interesting to hear that he continued to play even when he hated it. I mean your right in saying that a lot of people do what they hate but a sport. That is a new one.

  • Just another quick comment…my husband was so taken with this post that he is at the moment, laboriously translating it into Hungarian for his mom who is visiting us from Budapest. That is not an easy task. Thanks again for it. So inspirational.

  • Just another quick comment…my husband was so taken with this post that he is at the moment, laboriously translating

  • seo

    V look at someone like agassi and v so easily conclude that he’s happy but its not always true.

  • This was a really wonderful article for me
    I just finished reading Andre Agassi’s autobiography titled Open. I LOVE tennis bios, they are possibly my favorite book genre because I love tennis, but more than playing it, I love following the professional tour and especially the people in the game.

  • Just another quick comment…my husband was so taken with this post that he is at the moment, laboriously translating it into Hungarian for his mom who is visiting us from Budapest. That is not an easy task.

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